How Dogs Smell

Beagle Smell

Beagle Smell (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Did you know that dogs have practically miraculous smellers?  You did?  Okay, then, did you know that dogs can also smell the past and the future, as well?  Aha, I thought not!  Neither did I.

During the process of getting back to my blog and at least finishing the multi-part series What to Do in Case of Pet Grief, I came across this fascinating post* with the following, compelling sub-title:

Two dogs smell each other on the street in Mil...

Two dogs smell each other on the street (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Did You Know That Your Dog’s Nose Can Smell The Past, The Future, And Even Things That Cannot Be Seen At All?

Naturally, I had to rush to read it…and I came away amazed.  I have always loved my dogs pretty much unreservedly just because they were, well, part of my family and because they were dogs.  In my mind, I accepted that they were in many ways less capable than humans at many tasks, while also vaguely acknowledging that they were superior at other tasks, like sense of smell, night vision, motor skills, and so on.

After watching this video, I sat for a moment, letting my brain digest the wonders I had just seen.  My respect for canines, already a respectable size, grew astronomically.  All the things these wonder-critters could do–tracking, diagnosing, giving therapy AND sympathy…the list goes on!

Watch this for yourself.  I would cherish any insights on how it affected you in the comments below.

* Video reblogged from the Freekibble site
Text portion copyright 2015 by Sandra Bell Kirchman
All rights reserved by respective copyright holders.

11 Small Happinesses Only Dog People Truly Know

I reblogged this article from Barkpost because I related to it so strongly and thought you might enjoy it too.  You will notice that not all the pictures are the same as the original post.  This is because I couldn’t get them to copy over, so I picked new ones.  Look at the original pics — they are superb.  Copyright belongs to the individuals named.
SMALL PUP PLEASURES
spftim

giphy-2

Source: Giphy

2. Watching your adopted pup grow from a pup who will eat anything as fast as possible into to a picky lil gal (seems like a bad thing – but feels good to know she isn’t scared and hungry anymore).

sp2

Source: @rebeevans

3. Seeing your pup make friends at the dog park, and feeling like it’s your own personal accomplishment.

sp4

Source: Four Paws Pet Ranch

4. Getting out of places early when you want (a.k.a a built-in excuse to leave lame social gatherings).:)

walk-my-dog

Source: Sarah Says Read

5. When they lock eyes with you like they are talking to you with their eyes.

“I GET you, Mommy.” (Photo credit: SOMMAI | FreeDigitalPhotos.net

6. Inhaling that freshly groomed dog smell….

“I had my bath. Don’t I smell good?” (Photo credit: posterize | FreeDigitalPhotos.net)

7. Their sleepy eyes when you turn on the lights and they were sound asleep, and suddenly are like, “Whaaaaaa….?”

Tilly Tot:  “Whaaaa...?.”

Tilly Tot: “Whaaaa…?” (Photo credit: Sandra Bell Kirchman)

8. When they groan because you shifted a little and interrupted their nap on your lap.

Mommy: Say goodnight, Oreo. Oreo: Good...*yawn*...night. (Photo credit: Sandra Bell Kirchman)

Mommy: “Say goodnight, Oreo.”
Oreo: “Good…*yawn*…night.” (Photo credit: Sandra Bell Kirchman)

9. When you get home from a weekend out of town and they actually trip over their own feet trying to get to the door as fast as possible.

Dog's absolute joy when

Dog’s absolute joy when “Daddy” came home from Afghanistan. (Photo credit: You Tube – watch video here).

10. How in the midst of playing they stop and look back, just to check you’re still there.

HySCxMl

Source: Imgur

11. When you take shower they sit outside the bathroom to make sure you are ok.
When you come out, they lick the water off your feet, as if to say, “There there, you will be dry in no time.”

sp11

Featured Image via @dingoaday

What to do in case of pet grief – Part 2

Well, here we are, three months later…the worst thing a blogger can do is leave an unreasonable amount of time between posts, so if you are still with me, I am truly grateful and honored.

The original Angel of Grief in Rome.

The original Angel of Grief in Rome. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

You can get up to speed by reading my last post, “What to do in case of pet grief – Part 1.”

As suggested by one of dear Rumpydog’s followers, I located a grief counselor, named Crystal Bailey. She was not a pet grief counselor but a counselor re the death of humans and was connected to Bailey’s Funeral and Cremation Care in Yorkton, Saskatchewan. Actually, she had been recommended to me by one of the provincial health therapists.

I was really nervous at our first Skype meeting — there sat a rather pretty, rather youngish (to me, anyhow) woman, with a gentle voice, who looked just as ill-at-ease as I felt. That’s when I started relaxing. So she wasn’t some tiger who was going to pounce on me and preach at me. I didn’t think she was going to judge me either.

Crystal Bailey, Grief Therapist and Celebrant (Photo credit via Bailey's Funeral )

Crystal Bailey, Grief Therapist and Celebrant (Photo credit via Bailey’s Funeral and Cremation Care, Yorkton)

We introduced ourselves, and I explained the situation.  “Are you okay with the fact that the deceased is a dog (just Oreo had passed on back then) and not a person?” I asked. It seemed a little unusual when I found out she was the grief counselor at Bailey’s. The service was no charge and provided primarily as a courtesy to aid Bailey’s clients.

“I’ve never done it before–that is, counsel someone because of a deceased animal–but grief is grief. We can try it and see,” she answered with a kindly smile. I couldn’t help smiling back.

“Where do I start?” I asked.  We only had an hour and I didn’t want to waste her time, but the butterflies were getting restless again.

“I think we already started,” she said. “Why don’t you tell me a bit about yourself.”

That seemed like a pretty good idea. Like most people, I enjoy talking about myself. After an hour of describing how close Oreo and I were and the things we did together and how cute he had been, I realized I had hardly talked about myself at all.

Oreo, putting his paw down on Ling Ling (Photo credit: Sandra Kirchman)

Oreo, putting his paw down on Ling Ling (Photo credit: Sandra Kirchman)

I apologized for straying and tried to bring the conversation back on track. She smiled and told me to talk about whatever I wanted to, that I seemed to be dealing with the healing very well on my own. That heartened me, and pretty soon I was babbling away a mile a minute about how Oreo was such a gentle being but could put his paw down with “the girls” when he thought it necessary. Most of the time he let Ling Ling be top dog because he loved her, but he wouldn’t let her get away with EVERYthing, especially not a brand-new chew stick.

Time was up.

I was amazed at how quickly it had gone. And I still hadn’t talked a whole lot about me but did talk a whole lot about the three dogs and especially Oreo. It was the first time since Oreo had passed that I had been able to talk about him so extensively, and I told Crystal so.

“That’s good,” she said, “but you have to remember to take care of yourself.”

I paused, then nodded thoughtfully.

“If you want to, we’ll continue this next week, same time,” Crystal said. “In the meantime, you might want to practice being kind to yourself and taking care of yourself.  There’s not too much anyone can do about preventing someone’s death, but we can choose how we deal with it.  You could start thinking about how you want to deal with Oreo’s passing, and we’ll talk about it next time.  Also, why don’t you write a letter to Oreo telling him all the things you didn’t have a chance to say when he was here?”

That was a new thought for me.  Actually the whole thing was a new thought for me.  Crystal sat there smiling, and I waved until the screen went blank, and I was alone, except for Ling Ling snoring in her basket behind my desk.

We’ll continue Part 3 next week (or as soon as I can get to it). If I can, I will also fill you in on what has happened this last three months.  See you then!

Go here for comments attached to the last picture.

    Copyright © 2015 by
    Sandra Bell Kirchman.
    All rights reserved.

What to do in case of pet grief – Part 1

Tilly Tot, Oreo and Ling Ling:  "Yes, we're quite comfortable, thank you for asking."

Tilly Tot, Oreo and Ling Ling

As many of you know, my husband and I have lost two of our three beloved shih tzu dogs in the past four months — the youngest, Oreo, at age six on October 24, 2014 — and the oldest, Tilly Tot, at (about) age twelve on February 14, 2015. The first loss was agonizing; the second, paralyzing.

Oreo:  "My toy!"  A squeaky fave.  Photo credit:  Sandra Bell Kirchman

Oreo: “My toy!” A squeaky fave. Photo credit: Sandra Bell Kirchman

Oreo’s death, totally unexpected, left me in a rage of tears and anger. The pain wrenched at me so badly, I wondered how much more I could stand.  I cried even when I wasn’t aware of it, often waking up from a fitful sleep with tears on my cheeks. You see. Oreo was my loving buddy. While the other two played, or went outside in our big back yard, Oreo stayed by me, sleeping at my feet while I typed away on my computer. The two of us were together pretty much 365/24/7. His absence felt like one of my arms or legs was missing. How could I get along without it/him?

The Adorable Duo - Tilly Tot (rear left) and Ling Ling (front right).  (Photo credit:  (c) Sandra Bell Kirchman)

The Adorable Duo – Tilly Tot (rear left) and Ling Ling (front right). (Photo credit: (c) Sandra Bell Kirchman)

But I hadn’t taken into consideration our two remaining fur babies. Of course they missed Oreo, and they sensed that my mourning had something to do with him. In any event they redoubled their efforts to amuse, entertain, tease and titillate me. It seemed to be working a little.  By the beginning of February, I was able to sleep the night through and awaken with dry eyes and cheeks. I even started dabbling with my blog a bit, nothing too original, but at least I was thinking of returning and had my followers’ best interests blogwise at heart.

Tilly Tot comes to her forever home.

Little sweetheart,Tilly Tot

Then, on Valentine’s Day, our little sweetheart Tilly Tot passed on in the night from a blood clot after dental surgery. At first, grief encased me in a prison of numbness: I couldn’t cry, or laugh, or talk.  I moved around in a daze. After a few days, my outer appearance seemed normal — I talked, did my chores, poured love onto our one remaining fur child, Ling Ling.

However, inside was another story — my heart seemed crushed and my will to live retreated. Sleep became problematic, and I started looking really bad, to the point where the Big Guy (my husband) insisted I go to the doctor. The BG afterward told me I looked so bad, he would not have been surprised to come home from work to find me gone from the earthly plane.

A Ling Ling-Oreo-Tilly Tot story

Ling Ling – And then there was one…

On no account did this mean that I wanted to do myself in. On the contrary, I had made arrangements to start sessions with a grief counselor before Tilly passed, because of the slowness of regaining control of my life after the loss of Oreo. I fully intended to continue with this counselor…I wanted to live again, and I couldn’t as long as I wandered around the twilight zone I found myself in.

Next week, in Part 2, I’ll talk about the grief counseling, some of the other steps I have taken and the results. We are actually in the middle of my recovery: I am documenting it for my own reference, as well as for you in case, God forbid, you should find yourself in a similar situation.

 

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And then there was one…

Tilly Tot daytripping (with her human "sister"). Photo credit: Laurie M. Hamilton

Tilly Tot daytripping (with her human “sister”). Photo credit: Laurie M. Hamilton

With a heavy heart, I am letting you know that Tilly Tot, our elderly shih tzu rescue dog, passed away this morning after surgery. My husband and I are, as you might guess, completely devastated. Two of our three dogs gone in four months.

I thank you all for travelling on this journey with me. I will have to do some soul-searching, but I doubt I will continue this blog. Your interest in our three dogs has been gratifying. I am going to leave the blog up for a little while because I do believe that these articles are of interest to some people who haven’t seen them yet.

A DogTV Valentine’s Day

I have been trying to find information on dog television, since before Oreo passed, to help ease the Terrible Trio’s anxiety when Ernest and I left the house .  I recently found a pic on Facebook (see previous Inside Out) that was supplied by DogTV.  So I am going to let you wonderful pet parents and/or pet admirers check it out.  Below is their woofingly anticipated Dog‘s Valentine’s Day edition.

 Sorry, I can’t seem to embed the code properly.  Click here to access the video.

Happy Valentine’s Day!